Namespace:

Language

Headline

The namespace of software languages

Description

This namespace is dedicated to software languages, e.g., programming languages such as Language:Java, Language:Python, and Language:Haskell. Software languages are supposed to be described already elsewhere on the web, e.g., on Wikipedia, and thus, 101wiki coverage can be minimalistic and the 101wiki page for a language serves essentially as a linked open data resource. Metadata for a language should serve the classification of languages on 101wiki.

Metadata


Language:

Java

Headline

An OO programming language

Illustration

Let's show "Hello World" for Java.

public class HelloWorld {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("Hello, World");
    }

}

Metadata


Concept:

Software language

Headline

A software language

Description

The following quote, which was extracted on 1 March 2011 from the website http://www.sleconf.org/2011/ of "The International Conference on Software Language Engineering (SLE 2011)", serves as the approximation of a description: "The term “software language” comprises all sorts of artificial languages used in software development including general-purpose programming languages, domain-specific languages, modeling and meta-modeling languages, data models, and ontologies. Used in its broadest sense, examples include modeling languages such as UML-based and domain-specific modeling languages, business process modeling languages, and web application modeling languages. The term “software language” also comprises APIs and collections of design patterns that are implicitly defined languages."

Metadata


Language:

Haskell

Headline

The functional programming language Haskell

Details

101wiki hosts plenty of Haskell-based contributions. This is evident from corresponding back-links. More selective sets of Haskell-based contributions are organized in themes: Theme:Haskell data, Theme:Haskell potpourri, and Theme:Haskell genericity. Haskell is also the language of choice for a course supported by 101wiki: Course:Lambdas_in_Koblenz.

Illustration

The following expression takes the first 42 elements of the infinite list of natural numbers:

> take 42 [0..]
[0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,17,18,19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,27,28,29,30,31,32,33,34,35,36,37,38,39,40,41]

In this example, we leverage Haskell's lazy evaluation.

Metadata


Language:

Python